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Second phase The final concert in Athens
 

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The Odeion of Herodes Atticus is situated at the western end of the southern slope of the Acropolis, and is the last of the large imposing buildings built in this area which for centuries had been dedicated to the service of music and the dramatic arts. The building of the Odeion began in 160 A.D. by the famous Roman benefactor and sophist Tiberius Claudius Atticus Herodes in honor of his deceased wife Aspasia Regilla. As a patron of the arts, he designed it for musical and cultural events. The building was designed as an amphitheatre. The cavea measures 200 feet in diameter and its orchestra is 60 feet. In the tradition of the Roman theatres, the orchestra was a semicircle and the seats communicated directly with the scenery edifice. The audience area, the koilon, consisted of 32 rows of seats and could hold around 5000 people. The audience could get to their seats through six oblong scales and five intervening ones, used for the higher seats. The skene or monumental theatrical backdrop was three stories. The facade was adorned with a double row of pillars, whereas the entrances were at the rear ends. It was partially roofed. Between 1950 and 1961 the audience area was restored and floored with pentelic marble whereas the orchestra with Hymettus marble, in order to be used again for performances, notably classic tragedies and comedies, a tradition still preserved every summer during the Festival of Athens.

 
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